Category Archives: Helpful Information

Raising Awareness of Hearing Loss

To highlight and help increase awareness of hearing loss, this blog is dedicated to the efforts that surround the national campaign for May as Better Hearing and Speech Month. Hearing loss is ranked as one of the most common chronic health conditions that U.S. adults experience, affecting an estimated 48 million people nationwide. New polling released by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) reveals an overwhelming disconnect between the high value that Americans say they place on their hearing and their low willingness to be treated for any hearing loss. This has prompted a new public service announcement (PSA) campaign: Act Now on Hearing. This PSA will air nationwide for the next year educating Americans on the signs of hearing loss and guiding those affected to find care from a certified audiologist.

People with hearing loss often wait an average of seven years before seeking treatment. When left untreated, hearing loss has been linked to several other health problems, including social isolation and depression, cognitive decline, and increased stress levels. A 12-year study found that mild hearing loss doubled dementia risk, moderate loss tripled risk, and people with a severe hearing impairment were five times more likely to develop dementia (Lin, et al, 2011).

Additional statistics learned from a poll conducted by ASHA of nearly 2,500 adults ages 18 and older found:

  • 80% of Americans say maintaining their hearing heath is extremely important or very important to their quality of life.
  • Only 2 in 10 (20%) adults have had a hearing test in the past five years, compared with roughly 6 in 10 (61%) who have had their vision tested.
  • More than half (51%) of all adults reported having hearing problems, but only 11% of those respondents have sought treatment.
  • More than three-quarters (78%) of those with hearing problems have had these difficulties for one or more years—and over one-third (35%) have had trouble for five or more years.
  • A 42% plurality of Americans understand that mild hearing loss can impact a person’s life or daily functioning. Yet, more than half of those with untreated hearing problems (56%) say that they would be unlikely to treat it unless it was “severe.”

Click through for additional information on Attitudes and Actions Towards Hearing Health Survey Results findings from ASHA.

A global spotlight

The World Health Organization (WHO) released the first-ever World Report on Hearing projecting that by 2050, 2.5 billion people will be living with some degree of hearing loss. This translates into 1 in 4 people worldwide, at least 700 million of whom will require rehabilitation services.

Hearing loss can be addressed through effective and timely interventions. In children, almost 60% of hearing loss is due to causes that can be prevented through measures such as immunization, improved maternal and neonatal care, and screening for, and early management of, otitis media. In adults, legislation on noise control and safe listening, and surveillance of ototoxicity can help maintain hearing trajectories and reduce the potential for hearing loss.

Click through to learn more about the World Report on Hearing.

Take action now

It is important to act now for a variety reasons, but in particular the recent COVID-19 pandemic highlights the importance of hearing, which allows us to remain connected to others when social distancing and losing visual cues due to the use of masks.

As audiologists we have the platform to help increase awareness, motivate those struggling with hearing loss to take that initial step toward treatment, educate others on hearing technology and its benefits, and counsel each patient we treat on the importance of protecting our ears from loud noises.

How can you get involved?  Consider any of the following:

  • Volunteer to present to your local community on the effects of hearing loss.
  • Post the present statistics surrounding hearing loss and the benefits of hearing technology on your social media accounts.
  • Offer free hearing screenings at your facility.
  • Encourage your inner circle of friends and family to complete a basic hearing test.
  • Lead by example and treat your own ears with kindness by reducing exposure to loud noises.

If we each commit to doing one thing to help raise awareness together, we can make a difference!

 

References

Kochkin S & Rogin C.  Quantifying the Obvious: The Impact of Hearing Instruments on Quality of Life;  The Hearing Review, January 2000.

Lin FR, Metter EJ, O'Brien RJ, Resnick SM, Zonderman AB, Ferrucci L. Hearing loss and incident dementia. Archives of neurology. 2011; 68(2):214-20. NIHMSID: NIHMS336097 PubMed PMID: 21320988, PMCID: PMC3277836

American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) 2021. Attitudes and Actions Towards Hearing Health. Survey Results; www.asha.org

 World Health Organization (2021): Report on Hearing; www.who.int

About the Author:

Carissa Moeggenberg is an audiologist who has worked in the hearing healthcare field for the past 29 years. She is presently the Training Manager for Oticon Medical.

Female audiologist

Reducing the Clinic’s Burden: Online Patient Resources from Oticon Medical

The demand to provide hearing healthcare services remotely has reached new levels this past year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Remote hearing healthcare is not new—it has been discussed in audiology research circles for more than 20 years, been piloted and launched by Government Services and used by clinicians serving remote geographic locations.

TeleHealth, as defined by the World Health Organization, is “the use of electronic means to deliver information, resources and services related to health”. TeleHealth covers many domains, including electronic health records, mobile health, and health analytics. TeleHealth (also called eHealth) has the potential to provide more services to a wider population in a personalized manner. Prior to 2020, it was primarily intended to supplement in-person appointments, but has taken on a new meaning due to the recent pandemic and need for social distancing.

Reducing the burden on clinics by providing support for patient-related services and offering remote assistance to patients is a priority for us at Oticon Medical, which is why we have either created or further expanded several online support services for our hearing healthcare professionals over the last year. We detail a short summary of these services in this first blog of the New Year.

The Ponto Care™ App was expanded specifically to address the need for social distancing. It now provides your patients with an Aftercare section allowing them to access relevant information about everyday life with the Ponto, including user guides, instructional videos and a diary. More importantly, the Aftercare section allows recipients to monitor their implant site to ensure proper care is taken should an issue with the healing process occur. The app provides recipients with the ability to photograph their implant site documenting any changes that may occur over time. These photos can be shared or discussed with their healthcare provider should an issue occur during their recovery process, thus empowering patients for simple, easy device care.

Replacement Processor Support is an essential service for you and your patients. Should your patient need a replacement sound processor, we will extract their current program from their non-functioning processor, load the program(s) onto their new sound processor and ship directly to the patient. This removes you from the process so that you can focus your time on clinically billable services.

Oticon Medical Online Support Pages

Patients often have many questions regarding the insurance reimbursement process during their journey to getting a Ponto System or when upgrading their current sound processor. In order to reduce the amount of time you spend counseling on topics related to insurance reimbursement we have expanded our online services to provide additional support for your patients. Our Insurance Support Team has posted online information that includes the list of in-network insurance providers, frequently asked questions, intake forms and direct contact information on how to reach a member of our team.

Additional online programs to assist your patients can be found on our website under Support.  This section of our website offers instructional product videos, online warranty registration and product use guides.

Ongoing guidance and support from other recipients who have been on the BAHS journey to better hearing play a key role in assisting patients who are new to this technology. We encourage you to direct your patients to our Oticon Medical Friends program

for a deeper connection that only another bone anchored recipient can impart, thus easing the amount of time you spend on counseling.

Finally, to provide a place for you to build your expertise about Oticon Medical’s products, we have partnered with Audiology Online to extend opportunities for you to attend live webinars or watch recorded webinars from the comfort of your home or office. These sessions are typically 60 minutes in length and offer continuing education credits. Topics include clinical evidence, product updates, product fittings and advanced clinical management of bone anchored recipients.

We Value Your Feedback

We are committed to continually evaluating the services we provide and developing innovative remote care solutions that present value to those customers who fit and receive our products. Should you have suggestions or ideas on how we can improve our remote service programs please let us know!

We wish you all the best for 2021! Your dedication and skill make a difference every day to those affected by hearing loss.