Clinical Test Protocol for Evaluating Bone Anchored Hearing Benefit During Patient Trial Process

Bone anchored hearing implants are beneficial hearing solutions designed to improve patients’ hearing through direct bone conduction. They are indicated for use in patients who have conductive or mixed hearing loss or in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD).

Adult candidates considering a bone anchored solution have the opportunity to experience sound through an acute simulation during a routine evaluation appointment.  It is during that appointment that the audiologist typically will counsel on device, discuss the benefits and outcomes, and provide the opportunity for the patient to hear sound through a clinic demo device, such as a Ponto 3 SuperPower or a Ponto 4 sound processor. This simulation provides significant value to the patient considering non-surgical versus surgical treatment options.

As clinicians, we are taught the importance of verifying device benefit for patients with hearing loss when considering their hearing device options, and then again as they are being fit with their device. In fact there are well-established protocols and tools in place for hearing aid verifications and cochlear implant assessments. However, there are few recognized protocols in place for validating benefit in a patient using a bone anchored device. It is for this reason that Oticon Medical has developed a bone anchored hearing system test protocol to assess benefit and compare performance with various hearing technologies.

At Oticon Medical, we understand the demands placed on our clinics each day and also know the importance of providing best audiological practice to patients considering a bone anchored solution.  Therefore, we took on the goal developing a simple test protocol for audiologists using the resources already available in their clinic.

The protocol consists of a laminated card outlining four straightforward steps to verify benefit with a bone anchored system or compare performance between different solutions and a test record sheet for documenting the patient’s results. Using published research from Snapp, et al (2010) we modified their suggested protocol to create our version that reinforces the use of a test band for simulations, sound field speech in noise testing using the QuickSin, and the administration of a self-assessment questionnaire. Finally, the protocol outlines additional verification measures that can be completed as well as highlighting the proper reimbursement codes that may be used for this appointment. The protocol is recommended for all bone anchored hearing loss indications.

To learn more about this protocol, we encourage you to register for our upcoming training on February 24, 2021 or reach out to your regional clinical specialist.

About the Author:

Carissa Moeggenberg is an audiologist who has worked in the hearing healthcare field for the past 28 years. She is presently the Training Manager for Oticon Medical.

References:

QuickSin Speech-in-Noise Test. User Manual. Etymotic Research Inc. Version 1.3

Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Codes. Audiology. American Medical Association 2019

Snapp, H.A. et al (2010) A Clinical Protocol for Predicting Outcomes with an Implantable Prosthetic Device (BAHA) in Patients with Single-Sided Deafness. J Am Acad Audiol, 21: 654-662.

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